Linda Hoyle
The Fetch

For what was scattered
Is now gathered
What was gathered
Shall blow apart

For I shall go into a Hare
At crossroads cry a blues man's prayer
That hound dog howl, that Judas tree
The rain, the sun don't comfort me
Blue southern moon in troubled mind
Sings me, swings me, cries me blind
So sweet so low, so cruel so fair
For I shall go into a Hare

From flame to flame
From stars and storms
From bounded bones
From blood and stone
In streams and rain
In seed and earth
Both sown and lost
Will come to birth

Fetch my wild and ravished knight
Fetch the star of golden light
Fetch cold fortunes steely eye
Fetch confessions selfish cry
Fetch my boat on whale wave sea
Fetch my love who still loves me
Fetch tomorrow’s last goodbye
Fetch the song embrace the sky

For I shall go into a Hare
I'll tether dreams in midnight’s snare
Leap over ghosts both quick and dead
Hold memories by a golden thread
Redeem me still from fire by fire
With dance with chant, placation,prayer
So baffle time and times despair
For I shall go into a Hare

From flame to flame
From stars and storms
From bounded bones
From blood and stone
In streams and rain
In seed and earth
Both sown and lost
Will come to birth

Fetch the simple loving child
Fetch the fiddler bowing wild
Fetch high praise for music past
Fetch tomorrow's world at last
Fetch my sorrow laid in earth
Fetch birth breath from dark cavesmouth
Fetch my hearts bright stars above
Fetch high hope

Notes

The Fetch was the last track written for the album. By the time we got to this point we realized that the theme was memory, both of actual events and lost possibilities. The lyrics for the other songs had surprised me, often catching me off-guard, and even now remain somewhat puzzling. It was suggested that the album needed something to reflect a search, a sense of magic, an incantation to anchor what was coming later in the album.

Like most of the lyrics I write it took some weeks of reading, planning and dreaming. My notebooks are a maze of quotes and ‘bon mots’. So I ended up conflating two ideas: the first is the Hare from a line in a poem written in the mid 1600’s by a Scottish woman called Isobel Gowdy – ‘For I shall go into a Hare’. It is unclear whether she was killed as a witch, or that she freely confessed to being one. Her poem has been used several times by more modern writers and musicians in their work. Isobel claimed that she could transform into an animal in order to move about the countryside looking for lost things, perhaps freely watching others. The second is The Fetch. The origins of this term are unclear, but it is generally regarded as a wraith or ghost that possibly foretells death. In any case, it has threatening overtones and is not something that would settle one comfortably for the night.

I wanted the feel of the track to be as though something were rising up from the ground, ancient and inchoate. The first four lines are from a pre-Socratic philosopher called Heraclitus whose salvaged fragments were one of the few things that made sense to me when having a go at the discipline. The Heraclitus quote I use in the first few lines of The Fetch encapsulates what I want to say through the album: what was scattered from my past is gathered for a brief time in the music. What has been gathered will inevitably fall apart and vanish.

So the track is in essence both an invocation to remembering and a list of contents for the albums’ songs. Each song is referred to in the verse section and introduced by a shout. Some of the words in The Fetch have a T.S. Eliot influence, which also occurs elsewhere in the album. While not a fan of his world view I have loved his poetry since first encountering The Waste Land when I was nineteen. It’s all part of the musical and literary soup.